Tag Archives: scenes from the lilypad

Great American Bald Eagle

Fool that I was, upon my eagle’s wings I bore this wren, till I was tired with soaring, and now he mounts above me.    ~John Dryden

DSCF6621

So I was minding my own business snapping shots of a heron as the tide was going out. A few baby ducks were swimming about the buoy when all of the sudden down swoops an eagle trying to snatch one of the ducklings. Birds and ducks scatter everywhere and the eagle retreats up into a tree. Right above my head. I say, of course “hey there, Mr. Eagle!” and he cocks his head and stares down at me.

The rain was pouring pretty heavily when I took these photos.  It was worth getting wet.

DSCF6622 DSCF6629 DSCF6630 DSCF6618 DSCF6619 DSCF6631

A Tale of Three Cemeteries

All smaller, older cemeteries in the Port Orchard, Washington and surrounding area.

  • Bethel Cemetery
  • Sedgwick Cemetery
  • Colby Cemetery

The Bethel Cemetery is located 3 miles south of Port Orchard, Washington. The cemetery is located on the corner of Lider Road SE and Bethel Avenue and is behind the Grace Bible Church.

Driving Directions:  To get to the cemetery one should leave Highway 16 at the Sedgwick/Southworth exit driving east. At the Sedgwick and Bethel intersection, turn Right and travel on Bethel over the crossover of Hwy 16 just past the Bethel Towing Co. Crossing the overpass will have you facing Grace Bible Church.

 

 

 

 

The Sedgwick Cemetery is located on the outskirts of Port Orchard on Sedgwick Road.

Driving Directions:  From SR 16  take the Sedgwick Exit.  Turn right onto SR-160 (SE Sedgwick Road).  Stay on Sedgwick Rd for approximately 5.5 miles.  Cemetery will be on your right hand side. 
Sedgwick Cemetery was founded by the Ladies of G.A.R. General John Sedgwick Circle of Harper and Colby.  This cemetery was named in honor of General John Sedgwick, a Civil War Officer.   In the year 1905, a group of women, wives, daughters, and nieces of Civil War Veterans, organized the General Sedgwick Circle, No. 28, Ladies of the G.A.R., Women’s Auxiliary of the Grand Army of the Republic.  The charter members were Miriam Grant, Annie Cox, Mrs. Premo, Rosa Carr, Eva Peterson, Alice Kenney, Mrs. Ford Kenney, Juaquina Higgins, Annie Malone and Mrs. Myron Mix, all residents of Harper and Colby.  The Circle at once adopted a project, namely, a suitable burial place for the future use of veterans and their families.  Two acres of land, level and uncleared were bought from Major Carr of Harper.  In 1910, the little cemetery had been surveyed and platted.  Driveways and alleys were laid out and a formal dedication was made to the public.  Records have been faithfully kept and their pages show the names of many pioneers, women and men, who, by their industry and integrity, have helped to bring Kitsap County to its fine level of today.

The Colby (South Colby) Cemetery is located at the crossroad of SE Mile Hill Drive and Alaska Street SE in Colby (outskirts of Port Orchard), Kitsap Co., Wash.This small cemetery is in a wooded area and is on a slight hill, with a narrow dirt road leading up to it. The cemetery appears overgrown and unkept.

 

Into the Mist – Walking the Narrows Bridge Shoreline

The Tacoma Narrows Bridge is a pair of twin suspension bridges that span the Tacoma Narrows strait of Puget Sound in Pierce County, Washington. The bridges connect the city of Tacoma with the Kitsap Peninsula and carry State Route 16 (known as Primary State Highway 14 until 1964) over the strait. Historically, the name “Tacoma Narrows Bridge” has applied to the original bridge nicknamed “Galloping Gertie”, which opened in July 1940 but collapsed because of aeroelastic flutter four months later, as well as the replacement of the original bridge which opened in 1950 and still stands today as the westbound lanes of the present-day twin bridge complex.

The original Tacoma Narrows Bridge opened on July 1, 1940. It received its nickname “Galloping Gertie” because of the vertical movement of the deck observed by construction workers during windy conditions. The bridge became known for its pitching deck, and collapsed into Puget Sound the morning of November 7, 1940, under high wind conditions. Engineering issues as well as the United States’ involvement in World War II postponed plans to replace the bridge for several years; the replacement bridge was opened on October 14, 1950.

By 1990, population growth and development on the Kitsap Peninsula caused traffic on the bridge to exceed its design capacity; as a result, in 1998 Washington voters approved a measure to support building a parallel bridge. After a series of protests and court battles, construction began in 2002 and the new bridge opened to carry eastbound traffic on July 15, 2007, while the 1950 bridge was reconfigured to carry westbound traffic.

At the time of their construction, both the 1940 and 1950 bridges were the third-longest suspension bridges in the world in terms of main span length, behind the Golden Gate Bridge and George Washington Bridge. The 1950 and 2007 bridges are now the fifth-longest suspension bridge spans in the United States, and the 38th-longest in the world.

It’s an impressive bridge.

Location: Tacoma, Gig Harbor
Bodies of water: Puget Sound, Tacoma Narrow

Total length 5,400 ft (1,645.92 m)[1]
Longest span 2,800 ft (853.44 m)[1]
Clearance below 187.5 ft (57.15 m)
Opened October 14, 1950 (westbound)
July 15, 2007 (eastbound)

I’d never been to the Narrows Park. Today was a very foggy day and the water for the most part was still, the only movement from the ducks and gulls breaking the surface. I walked about a mile on the beach, passing only two fishermen. The solitary time was wonderful and I was happy to spend my time soaking in the environment around me with nary an interruption.

Two headed horse wood
Two headed horse wood

Froggie’s Cairns Christmas Tree

Nature never did betray the heart that loved her.   ~William Wordsworth

I love cairns.  Love making them, love designing them, love the symbolism behind them.    I love them so much I have devoted an entire page to both Cairns  and Inukshuks

They are trailmarkers, pointers for helping one to find ones way.  They have been painted or decorated for increased visibility or religious reasons.

I’ve made hundreds of them over the course of several years.  But this is the first Cairns Christmas tree I’ve ever made, or heard of for that matter.   It points upward towards the heavens, draped with crystal icicles and glittered cranberries.  The pantheist in me loves the natural easy flow upwards towards the heavens.  The Green in me appreciates the idea that when Christmas is over I will tear down this Christmas tree and recycle the stone for a pathway in my backyard.

Merry Christmas and happy holidays to all!

A Cairns Christmas
A Cairns Christmas

Living Nativity Village at Discovery Baptist Church, Gig Harbor, Washington

 “For unto us a child is born.” Isaiah 9:6   

Peninsula Baptist Church, 4902 Gustafson Drive, Gig Harbor.

This is the first time I have ever been to a living nativity village.  It was easily the coolest thing I’ve seen in a while.   I am not a practicing christian but it was so neat to see a christian community come together to create such a very interactive, vivid representation.  There were sheep, goats, horses, donkeys, chickens, ducks…markets full of grains and shekels and candles and traditional clothing.  There were guards and shopkeepers and shepherds in full garb, and little children welcoming with “Shalom!  Welcome to Bethlehem” as I was invited to go into the stores to browse and sample their goods.

It was very apparent the amount of planning, work and detail that had been put into recreating old village Bethlehem.  Kudos to the Discovery Baptist Church for creating a real, authentic place for us moderners to experience.  If ALL christian churches made the effort to bring in sheep and donkeys to their programs I’d be more inclined to be interested.

“Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.”  ~Corinthians 12:4-8

The angels watched their flocks by night.

DSCF5122

Bison Neighbors

Lots of people talk to animals. Not very many listen, though.  That’s the problem.     ~Benjamin Hoff, The Tao of Pooh

Bison

DSCF5285

DSCF5289

DSCF5290

DSCF5293
“Little Man,” the bull of the herd.

 

DSCF5295
They like carrots, celery and apples. Don’t feed them from your hand or you will lose fingers.

 

DSCF5297

DSCF5298
It isn’t every day I can see my reflection in the eye of a bull bison.

 

DSCF5299

DSCF5300

 

Still Still Still

Still, still, still,
One can hear the falling snow.
For all is hushed,
The world is sleeping

Dream, dream, dream,
Of the joyous day to come.
While guardian angels without number,
Watch you as you sweetly slumber.
Dream, dream, dream,
Of the joyous day to come.

~Austrian Christmas Lullaby

[All photos taken December 13, 2014 in the Key Peninsula, WA]

DSCF5273

DSCF5208

DSCF5211

DSCF5215

DSCF5228

 

DSCF5238

DSCF5241

DSCF5243

DSCF5255DSCF5229

DSCF5265

DSCF5267

 

 

DSCF5275

DSCF5205

DSCF5277

DSCF5313

DSCF5320

DSCF5340

DSCF5341

eagle sig

DSCF5310

DSCF5304DSCF5274