Category Archives: Photos

When I’m Old and Wise

As far as my eyes can see
There are Shadows approaching me
And to those I left behind
I wanted you to Know
You’ve always shared my deepest thoughts
You follow where I go
And oh when I’m old and wise
Bitter words mean little to me
Autumn Winds will blow right through me
And someday in the mist of time
When they asked me if I knew you
I’d smile and say you were a friend of mine
And the sadness would be Lifted from my eyes
Oh when I’m old and wise
As far as my Eyes can see
There are shadows surrounding me
And to those I leave behind
I want you all to know
You’ve always Shared my darkest hours
I’ll miss you when I go.

~Alan Parson’s Project,  Old and Wise

 

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Fantasy Canyon, Utah

Fantasy Canyon is a Bureau of Land Management-managed area located about 27 miles (43 km) south of Vernal, in Uintah County, Utah. Even though the area is only about 10 acres (40,000 m2) in size, it contains some of the most unusual geologic features in the world. The site was officially documented by early explorer and paleontologist Earl Douglass, who recorded the area by other names such as “The Devil’s Playground” and “Hades Pit.” He published photographs of this area in a 1909 publication called “The Columbian Magazine.”

The rocks of Fantasy Canyon, quartzose sandstones, were deposited during the Eocene Epoch. They date from around 38 to 50 million years ago. During the geologic period, the Uinta Basin was occupied by a large lake called Lake Uinta. The lake extended 120 miles (190 km) west to Heber City, 30 miles (48 km) east to Rangely, Colorado, south to the Book Cliff Divide, north to the Uinta Mountains, and was about a half mile deep.

Fantasy Canyon is along the east shore of what was once Lake Uinta, where the sediments eroded from the surrounding high lands. Sediments were deposited and the once loose sands, silts, and clays were forged into sandstone and shale. Because of different rates of weathering, the more durable sandstone remained while the more easily weathered siltstone and shale washed away, yielding this spectacular scenery. Today’s geologic formations of Fantasy Canyon will eventually give way to weather and then topple and erode into sand, but new formations will appear as the topsoil washes away. Because the delicate formations are so fragile the area is referred to as “Nature’s China Shop.”

There are black ribbons of coal-like material along the small washes on the trail or as horizontal stripes in the rocks. This magnetic material is called magnetite (iron oxide).

There are inch-wide, black-colored, subvertical, northwest-southeast trending gilsonite dikes that have intruded the rocks at Fantasy Canyon. Gilsonite, named after U.S. Marshall Samuel H. Gilson, is a type of asphaltite – solidified hydrocarbons. Gilsonite was discovered in the early 1860s. Starting in the mid-1880s, Gilson promoted the material as a waterproof coating for wooden pilings, as an insulation for wire cable, and as a unique varnish.

The Eocene-aged Uinta Formation is fossiliferous. It contains widely scattered bones, mostly mammals, which roamed the Basin during the Eocene. Fossilized turtle shells are visible in the area.IMG_3119IMG_3121IMG_3123IMG_3124IMG_3127IMG_3129IMG_3131IMG_3135IMG_3140IMG_3143IMG_3144IMG_3146IMG_3147IMG_3148IMG_3151

The Sparkle of Frost

He who marvels at the beauty of the world in summer will find equal cause for wonder and admiration in winter.   ~John Burroughs

 

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Frosted trees in the blue fog
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Fog blanketing the Salt Lake City valley
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Sun refractions creating blue fog
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Ducks at La Caille
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Little Cottonwood granite trying to peek through the fog.

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Snowflakes on berries
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Berry laden frosted tree
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Frozen fountain
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Remnants of Christmas in the fog
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Laden willow tree
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Froggie in the frost.

Elandan Gardens

http://www.elandangardens.com/  Located in Bremerton, Washington.

Have you seen it as you drive by?  I’ve been wanting to stop there for ages (I thought it was a nursery/garden) so finally put the brakes on and turned off from WA-16.  I was glad I did.  There are several components to this little hideaway heaven.  It is right on the water’s edge of the Puget Sound, about six acres and had been a very stair landfill.  In 1993 the Robinson family (Dan, Diane, Shanna and Will) began developing it starting with sandy fill dirt and over 800 tons of boulders, giving shape to the flat.

Elandan the word comes from Elan which is french for spirit and courage, and Dan, who is the true spirit of the Robinson’s bonsai collection.  While there is a museum/shop filled with all sorts of exotic trinkets, many with an eclectic Asian feel.  When I say trinkets I mean home decor, oil art, jewelry, and dazzling array of apparel.  They even have a chihuly piece!

Dan is a bonsai master.  He is described as a Pioneer of western Bonsai  (many of his Bonsai pieces are black pine and cedar) and you can see many of his works both at the garden and in this book:  http://www.amazon.com/Gnarly-Branches-Ancient-Trees-Robinson/dp/0615378501

The gardens are remarkable, a mix of plant and stone.  There are many pieces of twisted wood and jagged tree pieces reaching up to the sky.  Will is a stone artist and there are many basalt and granite pieces in the garden spread in a carved Stonehenge type of feel.

My most favorite part were the quiet ponds and tiny waterfalls.  The ponds floated several different types of lily pads and were flowering.

The experience was peaceful.  My son and I were the only ones there in the gardens so for a full hour we explored each nook and cranny, enjoying the amazing variety of Bonsai and sinking in the sounds of moving water and overhead birds.   I hate to tell people about little treasures like this place because I really liked having it all to myself but I just can’t help myself.

My pictures don’t do justice.  I only had my iphone5 on me so all of these photos were taken with it.  I will return.

Hope is The Thing With Feathers

emily dickinson

BY EMILY DICKINSON

“Hope” is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul
And sings the tune without the words
And never stops – at all
And sweetest – in the Gale – is heard
And sore must be the storm
That could abash the little Bird
That kept so many warm
I’ve heard it in the chillest land
And on the strangest Sea
Yet – never – in Extremity,
It asked a crumb – of me.