Category Archives: photo

Shoshone Falls

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Shoshone Falls (/ʃoʊˈʃoʊn/) is a waterfall on the Snake River in southern Idaho, United States, located approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) northeast of the city of Twin Falls. Sometimes called the “Niagara of the West,” Shoshone Falls is 212 feet (65 m) high—45 feet (14 m) higher than Niagara Falls—and flows over a rim nearly 1,000 feet (300 m) wide.

Formed by catastrophic outburst flooding during the Pleistocene ice age about 14,000 years ago, Shoshone Falls marks the historical upper limit of fish migration (including salmon) in the Snake River, and was an important fishing and trading place for Native Americans. The falls were documented by Europeans as early as the 1840s; despite the isolated location, it became a tourist attraction starting in the 1860s. At the beginning of the 20th century, the Snake River was controversially diverted for irrigation of the Magic Valley, with the result that the falls no longer flow with force year-round. However, irrigation and hydroelectric power stations built on the falls were the primary contributors to early economic development in southern Idaho.

A park overlooking the waterfall is owned and operated by the City of Twin Falls. Shoshone Falls is best viewed in the spring, as diversion of the Snake River often significantly diminishes water levels in the late summer and fall. The flow over the falls ranges from over 20,000 cubic feet per second (570 m3/s) during late spring of wet years, to a minimum “scenic flow” (dam release) of 300 cubic feet per second (8.5 m3/s) in dry years.

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Fantasy Canyon, Utah

Fantasy Canyon is a Bureau of Land Management-managed area located about 27 miles (43 km) south of Vernal, in Uintah County, Utah. Even though the area is only about 10 acres (40,000 m2) in size, it contains some of the most unusual geologic features in the world. The site was officially documented by early explorer and paleontologist Earl Douglass, who recorded the area by other names such as “The Devil’s Playground” and “Hades Pit.” He published photographs of this area in a 1909 publication called “The Columbian Magazine.”

The rocks of Fantasy Canyon, quartzose sandstones, were deposited during the Eocene Epoch. They date from around 38 to 50 million years ago. During the geologic period, the Uinta Basin was occupied by a large lake called Lake Uinta. The lake extended 120 miles (190 km) west to Heber City, 30 miles (48 km) east to Rangely, Colorado, south to the Book Cliff Divide, north to the Uinta Mountains, and was about a half mile deep.

Fantasy Canyon is along the east shore of what was once Lake Uinta, where the sediments eroded from the surrounding high lands. Sediments were deposited and the once loose sands, silts, and clays were forged into sandstone and shale. Because of different rates of weathering, the more durable sandstone remained while the more easily weathered siltstone and shale washed away, yielding this spectacular scenery. Today’s geologic formations of Fantasy Canyon will eventually give way to weather and then topple and erode into sand, but new formations will appear as the topsoil washes away. Because the delicate formations are so fragile the area is referred to as “Nature’s China Shop.”

There are black ribbons of coal-like material along the small washes on the trail or as horizontal stripes in the rocks. This magnetic material is called magnetite (iron oxide).

There are inch-wide, black-colored, subvertical, northwest-southeast trending gilsonite dikes that have intruded the rocks at Fantasy Canyon. Gilsonite, named after U.S. Marshall Samuel H. Gilson, is a type of asphaltite – solidified hydrocarbons. Gilsonite was discovered in the early 1860s. Starting in the mid-1880s, Gilson promoted the material as a waterproof coating for wooden pilings, as an insulation for wire cable, and as a unique varnish.

The Eocene-aged Uinta Formation is fossiliferous. It contains widely scattered bones, mostly mammals, which roamed the Basin during the Eocene. Fossilized turtle shells are visible in the area.IMG_3119IMG_3121IMG_3123IMG_3124IMG_3127IMG_3129IMG_3131IMG_3135IMG_3140IMG_3143IMG_3144IMG_3146IMG_3147IMG_3148IMG_3151

The Geese of Beverly Road

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We’ll take ourselves out in the street
And wear the blood in our cheeks like red roses
We’ll go from car to sleeping car and whisper in their sleeping ears
We were here, we were here
We’ll set off the geese of Beverly Road

Hey love, we’ll get away with it
We’ll run like we’re awesome, totally genius
Hey love, we’ll get away with it
We’ll run like we’re awesome

We won’t be disappointed
We’ll fight like girls for our place at the table
Our room on the floor
We’ll set off the geese of Beverly Road

Hey love, we’ll get away with it
We’ll run like we’re awesome, totally genius
Hey love, we’ll get away with it
We’ll run like we’re awesome

We’re the heirs to the glimmering world
We’re the heirs to the glimmering world
We’re the heirs to the glimmering world
We’re the heirs to the glimmering world

We’re drunk and sparking, our legs are open
Our hands are covered in cake
But I swear we didn’t have any
I swear we didn’t have any

Hey, love, we’ll get away with it
We’ll run like we’re awesome, totally genius
Hey, love, we’ll get away with it
We’ll run like we’re awesome

We’re the heirs to the glimmering world
We’re the heirs to the glimmering world
We’re the heirs to the glimmering world
We’re the heirs to the glimmering world

Oh, come, come be my waitress and serve me tonight
Serve me the sky tonight
Oh, come, come be my waitress and serve me tonight
Serve me the sky with a big slice of lemon

We’re the heirs to the glimmering world
We’re the heirs to the glimmering world
We’re the heirs to the glimmering world
We’re the heirs to the glimmering world

The Geese of Beverly Road (The National)

Home is Where the Heart Is

I live at Home.  No really.  I live at Home, Washington.    It is ripe with history, with anarchists and granolaites and nudists.  It’s out here in the Key Peninsulas and can I just say I feel so at home here?  😀

It is so beautiful.  I was born and raised in the deserts of New Mexico and lived in Utah for 25 years before coming out here.  It is true what they say about trees being revitalizing.    Trees are healthy, trees are good.  I love them and their green, expansive ways.

We have an indigenous tree called the madrona.  It has been in some of my previous photos but I will be highlighting them in a future post.

In the meantime, another few pictures of the place I call home.

Joemma Beach, two miles from my home.
Joemma Beach, two miles from my home.
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One of my favorite inlets. It’s right next to the post office and Home store .
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Joemma beach on a blustery day.
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Joemma Beach. The madrona trees have the red wood, you can see them peaking out from underneath the pines/cedars. You can get some pretty good sized crabs on this beach.
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Just on the south side of the dock at Joemma Beach.